North Walsham and District Community Archive

Sharing Photos, Voices and Memories of North Walsham in Norfolk

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6 hours ago

Karen Wardle

Thank you for the add. I am a member of NW Velo and we would like to hold an event in the town later this year to mark the WW1 Centenery. I believe the Kings Arms pub was used during the war by the Home guard as a base from where they would patrol the area on bicycles. If anyone can help with any information about this, any photographs or memorabilia that we could use we would be very grateful. Thank you. ... See MoreSee Less

 

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Please get in touch if you would like publicity in just north Walsham. editor@justregional.co.uk

2 hours ago

Diana Velhagen

Harriet (nee Turner) and Herbert Risebrow. Paternal grandparents of Gordon Risebrow ... See MoreSee Less

Harriet (nee Turner) and Herbert Risebrow.  Paternal grandparents of Gordon Risebrow

 

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Bernie Peet .... your gran's parents?

Scott Blyth, Daryl Blyth ... your great, great (?) grandparents ....?

is this photo of Harriet Turner / Hedge who lived in Swafield This lady was my grandmother She was mother of my dad Horace (Joe) & of Cecil & of Murial & of Laboun. I may be going up the wrong path. Could any person furnish me with any further info

4 hours ago

Ron Barrett

Just a notice to all of you who are enjoying the North Walsham archive site, Worstead Parish Council have a History Book of Worstead for sale. It is titled Footprints on the Sands of Time, was written by Peter Brice [former head of Paston College] and is available from me at £8.95. Drop me a message if you would like one. All proceeds go to Worstead Amenities and the Parish Council paid for all the publishing costs. ... See MoreSee Less

 

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I'll try and locate a picture.

This might interest you, Nick.

1 day ago

Diana Velhagen

From the collection of Gordon Risebrow, this is Ivy Hedge working as a land girl in WW1. She was the daughter of Louisa (nee Turner) and Boardman Hedge. Unfortunately Ivy died aged 20 in 1923. ... See MoreSee Less

From the collection of Gordon Risebrow, this is Ivy Hedge working as a land girl in WW1.  She was the daughter of Louisa (nee Turner) and Boardman Hedge.  Unfortunately Ivy died aged 20 in 1923.

 

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So young and what a beautiful young lady.

Great photo Louise Hedge was my great great aunt first time that I can remember seeing a picture of her daughter.

She is also a relative of mine, lovely photo!

is this the turner connection?

I believe she was my mother’s cousin and my mother was a Turner.

So Boardman Hedge was my grandmother's Agnes Mary Turner nee Hedge brother. She was married to a George Turner who died in France WW1. My mother always told me that two siblings married two siblings so would that be Louisa Turner and George Turner siblings married Agnes Hedge and Boardman Hedge ?

Photo shown earlier Trunch Fire service shows Arthur Hedge who I think was a sibling to Boardman and Agnes.

Ernest Turner, a blacksmith in the smithy just through the arch at the top of Market Street, into Mitre Tavern Yard, had the son George plus two daughters - Harriet and Louisa (and perhaps more). Harriet married Herbert Risebrow and had four surviving children - Ethel, May, Alice and Stanley. Louisa married Boardman James Hedge and had daughter Ivy (and perhaps others)

Very coincidentally my grandmother Agnes lived with the blacksmith at the time in Mitre Tavern Yard. He was Ernest or Edward Edwards, they were never married. She was there certainly at the time my parents were married 1946 until she was rehoused following the redevelopment of the area, the blacksmith having died some time before.. My parents lodged with Louisa and Boardman for a short whilst awaiting a new house on the Park estate Pound Road. I recall the blacksmiths shop very well with the anvil and bellows although it was not operational in my time. I was told that Mr Edwards was a blacksmith in France during the first war and was a victim of gas which left him with breathing problems.

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1 day ago

John Farrow

Worstead always seems to loom large on this site, my Aunt {89} is visiting my mother {92} this week they both lived at Worstead during the 1930`s/40`s so if you have any questions you feel they maybe able to answer please let me know and i will see if i can get an answer!! ... See MoreSee Less

 

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Like...do they remember a milestone near the kings head? Was it buried in the war, if so where?

Wow John. Who are your mother & aunt? My mum might well know them - she’ll be 90 in June.

hazel and enid cross lived at lyngate cottage {with the parrot in thew window!}

perhaps Auntie Joanne ? died several years after my grand mother died moved to a cottage in Honing row

Joan Cross was my God mother. My parents, Barbara and Eric Neave lived in Lyngate Lodge from 1952 to 61, they sold to Cecil and Peggy. Dad died last year but Mum asked to be remembered to your mother and aunt. She thinks Mr Cross the coalman was an earlier generation.

very sad re auntie Joan as she died in Hellsdon hospital and yes the coalman was from my grandmothers generation 1920`s? {uncle Tom}

Wonder if ur a relation ?!?!

I always send a Christmas card to Lyngate Worstead. And it always manages to find the recipient who isn't any of you!!

I was born at Lyngate House in 1961. My mum and dad (McLean) rented the house. I can remember for many years delivering Christmas buscuits to Dan Chapman who lived nearby.

I have just posted to say that Worstead has a newish History book which is a fascinating read. It has been written by Peter Brice [local historian] and published by the Parish Council of which I am a member. If you would like a copy you can get one from me at £8.95.

I live in back Street Worstead in the old tailor's shop.

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9 hours ago

Wayne Beauchamp

There's been many unexpected positive side effects to running this group which I never considered when I started it. I had two people tell me yesterday that, since joining this group, their perspective of living in the town has changed and they see all the mundane buildings and streets in a whole new way. It's hearing stuff like that makes all the hard work worthwhile, thank you :) :) ... See MoreSee Less

 

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Great work, North Walsham is my home town, but, some of the posts, especially the old photos can still suprise me !

I agree although I live in Walcott

Soldier on Wayne... 🏃‍♂️

That's education you are providing. It's great to share stuff.

Love this site . So interesting ! Well done Wayne!

Well done all.

Waynes (North Walsham) World...exellent

I was saying this to my son yesterday. Since joining this group I, too, see NW in a different way. It’s as if the town is still alive with the people who once lived here and it fascinates me! This has also encouraged me to start searching to find out who lived in my house over the many years since it was built. Hugh Cubitt, who had a Draper’s in the old HSBC building lived in my house in 1901 and before him Charles Goffe, a clergyman, with a 16 year old servant, Florence Hudson. I have a long way to go, back and forward, in time and I am actually a bit stuck, now, not knowing what to do to continue my search. My house feels more beautiful now and more “alive” I love reading all your posts and viewing pictures and old videos.

(Just a bit of trivia..in the above clip"Wayne" Mike Myers damaged his neck in the first take..thats why his grimacing and head banging with his chest,not neck)

We’re in the process of moving to North Walsham, and I can’t wait! This site (and the old photos of the town) is great-it’s informative and interesting. Thank you 😊

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2 hours ago

Diana Velhagen

Herbert Risebrow with his three daughters, Ethel, May and Alice (cWW1) . (He also had a son, Stanley.) From the collection of Gordon Risebrow. ... See MoreSee Less

Herbert Risebrow with his three daughters, Ethel, May and Alice (cWW1) .  (He also had a son, Stanley.)  From the collection of Gordon Risebrow.

 

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Bernie Peet ... your gran, Alice?

9 hours ago

Wayne Beauchamp

Paston School 1948-49.
Contributed by Russell Sparke.
... See MoreSee Less

Paston School 1948-49.
Contributed by Russell Sparke.

 

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I think that might be your dad, middle back, Gay Webster

Patsy Webster

Thomas Webster

Bob Gray is Dad on here do I think? About the right time? X

Will Webster think that might your dad in middle at back.

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1 day ago

Wayne Beauchamp

Market Day in North Walsham. 1990s.
Photo contributed by Paul Damen.
... See MoreSee Less

Market Day in North Walsham. 1990s.
Photo contributed by Paul Damen.

 

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Nice photo; but must have been taken in the Summer months?? going by the Dress Codes??

Must have been before town closed as taxi going up town

Seems a common thread that in many NW photos there is always a woman somewhere holding a bicycle! Must be a testament to Sid Salmon, Mr Willy and Arthur Griffin!!!

I bet the traffic wardens is hiding up there somewhere ready to pounce! He got me more than once.

I think the lady with the bike is Edna Dyke (was Bell). Possibly Veronica Rose with the dark hair and her 2 girls.

Looks so much smaller than now.. look how far the stalls are from the opposite pavement. Now come across to the bus stop.

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9 hours ago

Wayne Beauchamp

Jonathan Bloom from our committee has recently put together a list of all the street names and pubs from the 1843 maps we have. I thought some group members may be interested in how these names have changed in the last 175 years!

Roads in the town:

New Road (same); Yarmouth Road (same); Hall Lane (same); Aylsham Road (same).
The Loaks (now Station Road and Millfield Road);
East Street (now Church Street);
Reeves Lane (now Bacton Road);
School Road (now Grammar School Road);
Petticoat Lane (now Park Lane);
King Street (now King's Arms Street);
Antingham Lane (now Cromer Road);
Lower Street, leading into Swafield Lane (now Mundesley Road); School Loak (alley down to King's Arms); White Lion Loak (now Bank Loke);
Malthouse Lane, leading into Cats Pit Lane (now Northfield Road);
Back Street (now Vicarage Street);
Tan Office Street (once Back Street, or North Street)

Pubs in 1843:

Maid's Head (in Mitre Tavern Yard)! Bear Inn (Lower Market Street); Lord Nelson (beside the Bear); Angell (sic); Feathers; King's Arms;
White Lion (now Barclays Bank?) Black Swan: Cross Keys: Cock;
Dog (Bacton Road at top of Vicarage Street);;
Buck (Church Street);
White Horse (now White Swan);
Victoria (on Mundesley Road at the bottom of Vicarage Street; Nelson later??) Blue Bell;
White Horse (White Horse Common);
... See MoreSee Less

 

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Weren’t Back Street and Vicarage Street two separate roads? My recollection was Back Street crossing diagonally what is now the car park?

It was at one point but this is earlier than that when "Vicarage Street" was Called "Back Street" and what was called "Back Street" in the early 1900s was called "Tan Office Street" in the 1800s!!

Good work Jonathan

No Rising Sun or Anchor (on Spa Common) pubs?

Excellent

Petticoat Lane should be reinstated ... :)

Thank you. Really interesting

Great still learning about the town.

What an awful lot of pubs for 1 town!!

Grammar School Road was also Free School Lane at one point.

I reckon some of our ancestors lived in several of those addresses without moving house.

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3 days ago

Wayne Beauchamp

From the Norwich page so not specifically North Walsham but I bet this will be a familiar sight from days gone by for many of the group members.Recently renovated an old cottage this was the washing machine!!! Anyone remember using one my Gran had one in the scullery ... See MoreSee Less

From the Norwich page so not specifically North Walsham but I bet this will be a familiar sight from days gone by for many of the group members.

 

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I can remember my aunty lighting one and using it every Monday morning and using an old mangle to get the water out after rinsing by hand.

Memories, memories - all the rubbish got burned the sheets boiled happily in the copper and it was the devils own job to put them through the ringer - happy days.:)

Yes my Mum used them from as very young girl as her Mum had arthritis and her body was crippled by it, she'd also had scarlet fever Mum often tells us stories

Fascinating! Never seen one of these before!

I'm sure it's called a copper.

Yes, my Mother had one, a copper.

My mother had one of these,

Mum's still got the handcup used to top up water minus the handle due to amount of use, Dad used to wash the new potatoes in that when he was alive, bless him

My family had (a copper ) in the scullery at Bacton Green I have still got press on a long handle that was used to wash and squeeze the clothes

We had one when I was a child copper lit for the washing then emptied for cleaning then refilled for baths

Yes I had one too! Brilliant warm job was washday! All using rainwater from the tank...

Amazing find . I hope they leave it there as a feature .

Oh yes my mum had shed in the back yard she called the Wash House, it .contained a coal fired "copper" as she called it, lit early Monday morning, washing day

All right for whites.modern stuff might suffer abit

Yes we had one in our first home, in the corner of the kitchen, at the house down Knapton street, and the outhouse had the green mangle, the times my brother caught my fingers in it, yes Janet memories happy one's 😁😀

My mum had one, it was difficult to get the fire going so she would throw in some carbide. To stop it blowing the door off she had to hold the door shut with the poker. Dangerous times!

O yes my nan had one at white horse common. Ethel Bartram .

Time was when everybody had one, indoors, in the back house or in the shed.

oh yes we had one ,,down the garden,,ours was at white horse common also

It was used for the boil wash on Mondays and for the not water for the tin bath on Fridays.

Did mean hot water.

I can remember this when I was a tiny kid, in coronation road, my mum called it the copper-hole

We lived down grammar school road when I was little girl my mum had one in the shed. I can remember her using it

My man had one at Morris Road can remember her using it happy memories

Used to have a bath using rainwater heated in the "copper ", with a roaring fire underneath using a long galvanised tin bath !

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2 weeks ago

Wayne Beauchamp

A bit of high jump going on in this photo from Linda Hallatt. This will be local, probably North Walsham, although I have no details about location or date. Perhaps somebody will recognise those rooftops in the background as they are quite unique? ... See MoreSee Less

A bit of high jump going on in this photo from Linda Hallatt. This will be local, probably North Walsham, although I have no details about location or date. Perhaps somebody will recognise those rooftops in the background as they are quite unique?

 

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Could it be Station Rd. on the Paston School field??

I wonder if the rooftops on the right are 18 & 20 Norwich Road? Which would fit with the event being on Station Road playing fields...

It could be where Park Estate was built opposite the Primary School which was originally the Boys School and the Girls School - talking about 1920 ish ? perhaps or earlier - not sure when the school was originally built 180s

Yes Carol, I'm pretty sure this is on the old park which was built on in the 1940s and became Park Estate. Those houses in the background look very much like the two big semi-detatched houses on Pound Road with the chimneys of the smaller cottages to the right. Everything marries up perfectly except two chimneys on the right hand pair which I'm guessing were removed sometime as many tall chimneys appear to have around the town.

2 days ago

Beverley Beauchamp

wondering what uniform my great grandmother Annie Watts is wearing? Husband was Armine Watts with 3 sons Tom Greorge Fred all lived on Mill Rd Banningham. George was my grandad who married Ivy Vincent and lived opposite Banningham Garage ,cottages on corner of Bridge Rd. Clare Sturgess Marie Dobbie ... See MoreSee Less

wondering what uniform my great grandmother Annie Watts is wearing? Husband was Armine Watts with 3 sons Tom Greorge Fred all lived on Mill Rd Banningham. George was my grandad who married Ivy Vincent  and lived opposite Banningham Garage ,cottages on corner of Bridge Rd. Clare Marie

 

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Looks like an ordinary dress?

I had relatives living on Mill Road as well, and just round on the Aylsham Road at the garage and little shop in the railway carriages.

my Nan vincents mother Ellen brought property and land to family .they owned post office,land and property down bridge rd,houses by mill rd and up the hill along aylsham rd. Nan lived along on the left hand side just before millrd and her and grandads gardens backed onto eachother... then they married and lived on bridge rd..1st 2 cottages where dad lives niw. Family still live in and around area.

this says its a wi uniform but mostly it seems there isnt any

Teresa.. is this some part of your family?

It was just a dress, Beverley. Annie Jane was my grandmother and I remember her wearing this dress on Sundays. She was a lovely nanny too. x

ive found out LOTS about our family thanks to Archive page since i posted this .. thanks Gwennie!

Glad to help and nice that the family will be remembered.

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1 day ago

Diana Velhagen

Arthur John (known as Jack) Pycroft in middle row, 2nd left. Oldest son of Arthur and Edith Pycroft. Jack is wearing the cap insignia of the Lincolnshire Regiment. Photo taken in North Walsham - the vicar looks familiar, Rev Aitken perhaps? Nicholas Groves. From the collection of Gordon Risebrow. ... See MoreSee Less

Arthur John (known as Jack) Pycroft in middle row, 2nd left. Oldest son of Arthur and Edith Pycroft.  Jack is wearing the cap insignia of the Lincolnshire Regiment. Photo taken in North Walsham - the vicar looks familiar, Rev Aitken perhaps? Nicholas Groves.   From the collection of Gordon Risebrow.

 

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Paul Kearvell....

He would go onto serve in the 2nd Battalion

Was Rev. Aitken related to Mr. Aitken who was headmaster at Millfield School. ?

i think it must be as those windows are the back end of what was aitken house yarmouth road. also previously the old vicarage

I don’t think it is Rev.Aubrey Aitken.

Far left on back row in the fine flat cap is my grandfather Harry Mobbs. He was born in 1895 and joined the territorials before the great war. He fought first at Gallipoli and then at Gaza where he was injured and captured by the Turks.

Harry Mobbs was 5th Norfolks

That's interesting Steve. We know nothing about him serving in the Balkans.

The Balkans is the region he went into as the 6th August 1915 puts them at Lemnos. From there they went to Gallipoli landing at A Beach on 10th August.

thanks for showing this;a few of the faces might be recognized!

sorry to leave out "like"; look at all those regiments! can anyone fix a date?

Looking at the uniforms and the fact that some of them have the 14/15 Star ribbon I am going to say Circa 1918.

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1 day ago

Diana Velhagen

Miss Winifred Pycroft (born 1910) and her brother George Pycroft (born 1909) in the front garden of Loads Buildings, c1928. Winifred would marry Stanley Risebrow in 1931 and have children Pauline in 1932 and Gordon Risebrow in 1934. ... See MoreSee Less

Miss Winifred Pycroft (born 1910) and her brother George Pycroft (born 1909) in the front garden of Loads Buildings, c1928.  Winifred would marry Stanley Risebrow in 1931 and have children Pauline in 1932 and Gordon Risebrow in 1934.

 

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Paul Kearvell ... your aunt and uncle I believe?

Stanley was my gran’s brother both Stanley and my gran worked for many years at the laundry.

Auntie Winnie and uncle George

Scott Blyth Daryl Blyth Dean Blyth Look Nanny Winnie

Wow! My great nan!

THIS IS AMAZING!! Nanny Winnie!!! x

Just think how many local musicians less North Walsham would have had if it wasn't for Nanny Winnie!

i thought u would aii this;wayne explain?

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